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Bristol Greenground Map – connecting parks and open spaces in and around Bristol

Bristol map is the third map of the Greenground Map series and connects the parks and open spaces to inspire walks (and bike rides) inside and further out in the city. With 10 inspiring green lines and around 250 green spaces to explore, the map does not only include the inner Bristol, but expands to other areas such as coastal town Portishead as well as links to surrounding countryside; also including the Bristol and Bath railway Path – a walking and cycling path to neighbouring city Bath.

Bristol’s most famous and recognisable landmark is River Avon, which also becomes the first line on the map. River Avon Trail is also the most easiest line to navigate, running from Avonmouth to Bath. I’ve included two more river lines – Frome and Hazel Trym that offer nice walks along the riverbank, if not all the way then at least on some sections on the line. The Woody Line in the West of Bristol covers the leafiest area – Leigh Woods and Ashton Court as well as some of the nature preserves further away.

As Bristol is very creative city and the street art has become a very important scene over the past years I also included a Street Art line which includes some more nature inspired works. The Upfest festival location on North Street is one of the main areas to see murals such as One Love Coral Reef by Louis Masai or Cheeky Seagull near the Greville Smyth Park. Park murals also include Ollie Gillard’s nature murals in the Redcatch Park, a new St George Park mural and Eurasian Lynx by ATM near King’s Square.

Working on this map was an opportunity to take a walk down to memory lane, as I walked and cycled all over and up & down Bristol during my MA. I remember long walks to Bower Ashton from Bedminster on weekends and crossing the misty Avon on the bike on my way to work in the mornings. Although I know few of the routes covered on this map, there are many more I haven’t walked on and making this map has been truly mind expanding. I hope you enjoy using this map as much as I did making it!

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Green city – Bristol

This week’s green city is Bristol as one of the greenest cities in UK and home of many green enterprises, festivals and BBC Nature. I chose Bristol as I lived there during my postgraduate studies and did lot of walking and cycling during my time as a student. Our campus next to Ashton Court park was in a very leafy setting with deer park next to it and my student house in Southville in walking distance from everywhere. πŸšΆβ€β™€οΈ

Bristol’s green mentality is in fact so strong that it was awarded the European Green Capital award in 2015 as first city in UK. As a walkable/cyclable city with healthy air, strong green economy and further goals to change the city transport and energy more sustainable, Bristol scored all the boxes to win the green city award. Since then there has been even a stronger focus on green development and the city offers many green activities.

According to Visit Bristol the city has proportionally more parks and green spaces than any other city (over 400) and nature is never very far away. Bristol also has over 1100 hectares of Nature Reserve sites, some of them such as Avon Gorge is nationally important site with 30 rare plant species and several rare wildlife species that only exist in this site. With such rare habitat it has a Special Area of Conservation status.

Before Bristol became the Green Capital it was the first cycling city back in 2008. It’s the birthplace of the National Cycle Network and Sustrans – UK walking and cycling charity. Now Bristol has 300 bike parking spaces and getting around on bike is popular for both Bristolians and visitors (despite the many Bristol hills). You can even take a bike trail to Bath or practise mountain biking on Ashton Court park tracks.

River Avon is the main landmark in Bristol and closeness of the sea has strong influence on the city’s maritime culture. This is apparent near the Harbourside, especially around the M Shed and on the riverside walk to Brunel’s SS Great Britain. Bristol has altogether 100 miles of waterways – interconnected rivers and canals to walk, cycle or explore on a boat or passenger ferry.

Making the infographic definitely inspired me to revisit Bristol and I think this green city will always remain close to my heart. πŸ’š